Tamer Hashem: “I thought that there were things that I can do as a man but if a woman does the exact same thing, that would be completely inappropriate. “

Drumming to tunes of both our happiness and misery, Cairokee’s one and only Tamer Hashem has always been our favorite drummer boy. His contributions to the band’s extraordinary use of musical instruments has added a twist to the underground experience. 

In your opinion, how would you define manhood?

 

Manhood is about ethics that guide our relationships with others. 

How does society define manhood? 

It is mostly measured by how controlling you are, be it of your family, neighborhood, or friends. It is just the idea that you are superior enough that everyone else falls under you. 

Are there any false concepts or notions about manhood that we inherit?

When I was young there were many notions that I had acquired from society until I stopped and realized how wrong they are. I thought that there were things that I can do as a man but if a woman does the exact same thing, that would be completely inappropriate. 

Do men cry? 

I personally can cry while watching a movie, or when I am put in a situation that provokes me. Our society taught us that crying is for women, but we are all humans and we have feelings so there is nothing shameful about it. 

How did your parents help you understand the meaning of manhood?

My parents had me when they were very young. My father would beat me up to try to make me tougher, and that made me grow to have anger-management issues. That is a side I don’t like, but he also taught me how to love and empathize with those around me. 

How do you think misconceptions about manhood affect families?

We have this idea of a “male-headed house” where one dominant male takes all the decisions and does not consider his partner’s opinions. 

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