Egypt’s Olympic Medalists; A Great Example of our Nation’s Lack of Support

Egypt’s Olympic Medalists; A Great Example of our Nation’s Lack of Support

Dear President Sisi,

Today, when we as Egyptians talk about our pride, we talk about our history and Pharaonic era more than anything, but we never seem to find anything worthy of our pride in our current civilization. How sad is it that we can’t find other accomplishments worthy of our pride today? What are we leaving for future generations to come to find pride in?

 

What do we as a nation do in order to push and build our human resources, talents and skills?

 

A timely example can be drawn from the current ongoing Olympics. The two bronze medal winners in weightlifting – Sara Samir and Mohamed Ihab – are perfect examples of our failure to fully support our talents. As Ihab said during his interview in an episode of Medhat Shalaby’s TV show last December, “the system does not give me what I deserve. All the money I’m given is for the practices and championship preparations, but there are no personal rewards as a champion for my accomplishments”. He has won gold, silver and bronze medals on an International level. And 6 medals on the African level, but has never gotten enough compensation to even buy an apartment.

“Unfortunately, many others who are as skilled as and even more skilled than Ihab get discouraged and fall victim to neglect”

Furthermore, he does not have health insurance. And the Fayoum stadium he practices at occasionally does not have a single changing room and the equipment are 15 years old and worn out. Yet, Ihab managed to still find the determination, through the support of his coaches and family, to continue regardless of such an unsupportive atmosphere. Unfortunately, many others who are as skilled as and even more skilled than Ihab get discouraged and fall victim to neglect. This is the same kind of neglect that Sara Samir faced, although she won a bronze for her country, she was refused from taking her final exams, without having any exception made in return for her accomplishment.

“Another example is 17-year-old Egyptian Deena Moussa, who discovered in New York a product that stops the bleeding of lethal wounds in between 7 to 10 seconds”

On a similar note, have you noticed that all those who do great things in the name of Egypt, at one point or another have had to travel outside of Egypt? Nobel prize winner Ahmed Zewail is just one example. Another example is 17-year-old Egyptian Deena Moussa, who discovered in New York a product that stops the bleeding of lethal wounds in between 7 to 10 seconds. Moreover, she wants to sell it for cheap; not only is she a brilliant young scientist, but a humanitarian. Now, imagine thousands of people like her and Zewail and Samir and Ihab walking around in one country, unable to set their ideas and skills free. It tells you, and the world, that we are unequipped and unfit to nourish such humans. We are not only unfit, but we are also horribly unsupportive. We turn a blind eye to accomplishments and to such valuable people for reasons I fail to comprehend.

“Zewail once said referring to Egypt, “I was fought a lot”. We only hope that no one is ever given the reason to feel this way ever again”

Our nation would be greater if we abolish this corruption. It affects the success of our nation and its citizens. We must use our nation’s income to build schools, fix our health system and nourish our brains and skills. Zewail once said referring to Egypt, “I was fought a lot”. We only hope that no one is ever given the reason to feel this way ever again.

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